Centre Bell Seating Chart

The Bell Centre is probably foreign to a lot of NHL fans in the United States because it’s located in Canada for one, and also because attending a game there is so expensive. If you’re taking a family of four to the game, you’re looking at spending upwards of $1K just to get in the door. The Bell Centre doesn’t have the history of the old Montreal Forum, its predecessor, but it offers one of the best NHL environments for fans. It is also the largest arena in the NHL. With four seating levels and many distinctly priced seating areas in between, we wanted to dissect the Bell Centre seating chart to help fans find their way around the stadium more easily.

The first thing you need to know is that the Montreal Canadiens organization uses a pricing model for “regular games” and “optimum games”. The optimum games are more expensive to see and below are the designated optimum games for the 2015-2016 season.

All Home Games vs. the

 

Toronto Maple Leafs

New York Rangers

Boston Bruins

Chicago Blackhawks

Washington Capitals

Los Angeles Kings

Tampa Bay Lightning

 

We’ll first start with the Prestige/Platinum seats on the arena’s lower level. If you’re inquiring about a particular section, please refer back to the previous page.

 

Platinum Seats

View from the Prestige Seats at Bell Centre

 

Prestige Seats

 

 View from the Prestige Seats at Bell Centre

The platinum and prestige seats sit right next to the glass on the Bell Centre’s rouge level. The Platinum seats are the closest seats to the ice in the entire building (row AA) and the prestige seats are in rows BB-FF. Face value for the platinum seats will be either $278 or $451 depending on the opponent. Expect to pay even more than that on websites like Stubhub. Face value for the Prestige seats for the 2015-2016 season are priced at $215, $227, $347 and $368 depending on the section and opponent. The Canadiens use the bench in front of section 102. The visitors use the bench in front of section 124.

 

 

 

 

Rouge Level (Red)

 View from the Rouge Seats at Bell Centre

The rouge seating area is basically all other 100 level seats or the rest of the lower bowl at the Bell Centre that's not "platinum" or "prestige". It’s called “rouge” due to its red seats. It consists of sections 101-124. Face value for each ticket will be from $140-$323 depending on the opponent and section. The view is excellent from virtually every seat but none of these seats are right next to the glass. Those are the platinum/prestige seats which we previously mentioned above. There are four distinctively priced areas on the red level as well; Red A ($181, $292), Red B ($154, $259), C ($140, $223) and D ($140, $223).

 

 

 

 

 

Club Desjardins 

View of the inside of the Desjardins Club at Bell Centre

Photo Source: TheSportsNomad

The Club Desjardins seats are all on the 2nd level of the Bell Centre, often called the “Club Level”. The area is designated into two distinct seating areas; A and B. Area A consists of sections 201-203, 211-215, 224 and 233. Area B consists of sections 204-210 and 216-222.

View from the Club Desjardins Seats at Bell Centre

Here you will get the most amenities in the entire arena such as bigger and more comfortable seats, access to 3 lounges, private entrances and complimentary food. Face value for these seats will run you from $169-$372 per ticket depending on the row and opponent.

 

 

 

 

 

Blanc Level (White)

 View from the Blanc Level Seats at the Bell Centre

These are the 300 level seats at the Bell Centre, also called the white level. There are four different seating designations for this level; white ($92, $145), white first row ($101, $159), white center ($101-$159) and white first row center ($109-$174). Why they’re called that is pretty self-explanatory; the ticket price is based entirely off of the location and view of the ice. All of the rows in each section on the white level will be lettered AA-FF.

 

 

 

 

 

Gris Level (Grey)

 View from the Grey Level at the Bell Centre

The grey seating area is the last four rows (rows A-D) of sections 301-336. Face value for these seats are $73 or $114 depending on the opponent. The view of the ice is pretty solid; much better than any seat in the 400s level seats. The view of the scoreboard at center ice is spectacular.

 

 

 

 

 

Bleu Level (Blue)

View from the Blue Level at Bell Centre 

The blue level seats consists of sections 401-406, 414-425 and 431-436. These will be the last four rows (rows A-D) of every 400 level section on the upper sides of the arena. These will be the best seats on the 400 level of the Bell Centre but will be far inferior to the other seating levels. Face value for these seats will be $56 or $85 per ticket depending on the opponent.

 

 

 

 

 

Molson Canadian Zone

 View from the Molson Canadian Zone at Bell Centre

This area has also been known as the “Molson Ex Zone”. It consists of sections 407-413 and has only four rows of seats; A-D. In case you didn’t know, the Molson brothers are also part of a partnership group that owns the Montreal Canadiens. This area has a live band stage in the concourse featuring live music. A very nice touch for fans sitting on the upper level.

 

 

 

 

 

La Petite Bretonne Family Zone

View from the Family Zone at Bell Centre 

The Family Zone are the uppermost seats behind the net the Canadiens attack twice. This area offers the cheapest tickets at the Bell Centre and has only four rows of seats; rows A-D. Tickets for children are $22 face value and adult tickets are $56 or $85 per ticket face value depending on the opponent. If there is one area of the arena I would keep away from, it would be this one. It’s just not worth the money although it's the only option sometimes for Canadiens fans that want to take their children to a Habs game.

We hope our breakdown of the Bell Centre seating chart has helped you become more familiar with the layout of the NHL’s largest arena. Before the game, be sure to check out La Cage Aux Sports. It’s a massive sports bar at the Bell Centre and is often touted as one of the best sports bars in North America. You may have to ask for a menu in English since French has such a heavy influence in Montreal. 

 

 

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